We all have good intentions in this work. Sometimes, though, we don’t get the results we want. In order to maintain a tight match between our intentions, our actions, and our results, it’s important to be explicit about how change happens. How can we translate our intentions into actions that yield the results we say we want? A good theory of action helps us ensure an accurate translation. Provocative Practice’s theory of action, the third Provocative Practice Fundamental, states that:

IF WE COMMIT TO A VISION OF STUDENT SUCCESS that has at its center engaged and achieving students prepared for college, career, and 21st century success . . .

AND IF WE ARE RELENTLESS IN CLARIFYING AND SUPPORTING CLASSROOM LEADERSHIP focused on improving the quality of classroom instruction and interactions for students through the use essential pedagogical practices for environments of high intellectual expectations and performance and 21st century culturally and linguistically responsive curriculum, pedagogy, resources, and assessments . . .

AND IF WE BUILD AND SUPPORT SCHOOL LEADERSHIP that provides instructional clarity and coherence for students through effective principals, leaders, and teachers, caring staff, and engaged families and community . . .

AND IF WE ORGANIZE DISTRICT LEADERSHIP around our core values and instructional priorities to most effectively provide the resources and responsive professional development, nurture the positive and trusting relationships, and enact the mutual accountability our schools need to do what we are asking them to do for students . . .

THEN WE WILL BECOME A STATE OF HIGHLY EFFECTIVE AND EQUITABLE DISTRICTS AND SCHOOLS that fully engage all students, defying the predictability of demographics, and that prepare all students as high achieving and creative, responsible, and successful 21st century citizens who will live their lives to their fullest potential.